Nasa colour images of Saturn revealed | Daily Mail Online

Nasa colour images of Saturn revealed | Daily Mail Online

Nasa colour images of Saturn revealed | Daily Mail Online

Among the images that are just colored, one is treated by Sophia Nasr, a physical astro-particles working on dark matter.
The blue sky, seen ring around the center of the image is the eye of a permanent hurricane 1,200 km (1900 km) north pole of Saturn.
Clouds are buzzing around the eye of the hurricane, 20 times greater than ever seen on Earth at 330 miles per hour (530 km / h).
And the beautiful light blue color is not due to a false coloration – this is caused by the scattering of sunlight, the same phenomenon that produces a blue sky on Earth.
To create the original image, Nasr collects images taken using three filters: blue, green and red.
By adjusting the contrast, brightness, and other factors in the photograph, Mrs. Nasr was able to produce an image that reveals how Saturn would look at the naked eye at that distance.
Each of the three color filters used by NASA reveals different details in the cloud and by combining the three in a composite material, the agency gets a “more complete” image.
Jason Major, a graphic designer, also created a certain point of view of the eye color of Saturn’s hurricane, using images taken by Cassini on April 26.
The eye is part of a larger feature of Saturn known as the hexagon name, produced at the North Pole by a six-sided jet pattern.

According to NASA, propellers are bright and narrow “disturbances” that are produced by the gravity of the “invisible embedded goggles.”
The image was captured on April 19 with the narrow-angle camera of the spacecraft, showing propeller belts in the striking new detail.
With this information, researchers can obtain a “particle size distribution” for propeller moons, or small moons of mysterious origin that exist inside the rings of Saturn.
This particular view shows a point about 80,000 miles (129,000 kilometers) from the center of Saturn.
Last week, NASA also released an advance of some of the most “intensely bright” clouds still observed on Saturn’s moon Titan.
Two weeks after their final big dives, Cassini Titan continued to monitor from a distance, revealing breathtaking views of the faint methane clouds radiating skyward.
With summer on the way to Titan’s northern hemisphere, scientists expect cloud activity to increase – and the machine already detected several explosions
The latest views of the Cassini spacecraft were captured on May 7 during a non-specific flyby, at a distance of 316,000 miles and 311,000 miles.
The images reveal the lakes and the hydrocarbon seas of the moon as dark spots on the top.
And three bands of bright methane clouds can be clearly seen above the surface.
The brightness is believed to be the result of high clouds, and this explosion is the biggest observed on Titan since the beginning of last year.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *